Coronavirus

As business closures increase due to the COVID-19 pandemic, employers are faced with questions about compensation and health benefit coverage for their employees.

COVID-19 Resources and Updates for Employers

  • World Health Organization (WHO)

          https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

         Interim Guidance for Businesses and Employers to Plan and Respond to Coronavirus Disease

          Calvetti

Executive Orders from Governor Abbott - The Report to Open Texas

Federal Law COVID-19 Law Update

Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA)

Since the enactment of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act on March 18, new information and guidance has been released every few days, though still much slower than employers would like. We have summarized what we believe to be the most relevant new information below. We will continue to update Comply multiple times per day to keep you informed, and we encourage you to visit the site regularly for updates.

Required FFCRA Poster

The Department of Labor (DOL) has released a mandatory employee rights poster for the FFCRA. It should be posted or distributed to employees electronically (via email or online portal) by April 1. More information on the requirements can be found here.

Enforcement of FFCRA

The DOL will not bring enforcement actions against employers for violations of the FFCRA prior to April 17, 2020, provided that the employer has made reasonable, good faith efforts to comply with the Act. You can read more about the brief non-enforcement period here.

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act)

On Friday, March 27, the President signed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act). The new law is a $2 trillion economic stimulus package designed to repair the economic damage caused by COVID-19 and provide additional protection to individuals and businesses who may lose income due to the pandemic. While most of the act pertains to direct payments and loans, there are some sections that affect employers.

Providing Alternatives to Closure and Layoffs

The CARES Act gives employers the following options and benefits, which may allow them stay open and keep more people employed:

  • Small businesses may be eligible for emergency grants of up to $10,000 to cover immediate operating costs.
  • The Small Business Administration (SBA) may provide loans of up to $10 million per business; any portion of that spent to pay employees, keep workers on payroll, or pay for rent, mortgages, or existing debt could be forgiven, provided workers remain employed through the end of June.
  • Small businesses with existing SBA loans may have up to six months of payments waived.
  • Businesses who have experienced a decline in gross receipts of 50% as compared to the same quarter of 2019 or who have been fully or partially shutdown by order may be eligible to receive a refundable tax credit for 50% of qualified employee wages up to $10,000 per employee. This is unrelated to the dollar-for-dollar payroll tax credit that can be taken for FFCRA leaves.
  • Businesses may defer payment of employer payroll taxes imposed between the enactment of this law and December 31, 2020 with half of the deferred taxes due by December 31, 2021 and the rest due by December 31, 2022. This is unrelated to the dollar-for-dollar payroll tax credit that can be taken for FFCRA leaves.

We encourage you to follow the IRS Coronavirus Tax Relief page and the SBA Coronavirus Loan Resources page, as well as consult with your tax professional or financial advisor. Detailed guidance on how to access these financial resources should be coming soon from those sources.

Impact on Unemployment Insurance

The act expands unemployment benefits by 13 weeks and adds $600 to the weekly amount an individual would usually receive. While these unemployment benefits are generous, employers should still consider their options and incentives under the CARES Act mentioned above before making decisions about reduced hours, furloughs, or layoffs.

Employees who experience reduced hours, furloughs, or layoffs should be encouraged to file for unemployment insurance as soon as possible. We recommend that both employers and employees visit their state’s unemployment insurance department website and track local and state news, as departments across the country are updating their rules to facilitate displaced workers during this time.

Looking for addition resources? Find out more by clicking on the links below:

Financial Relief Program

Guide to Creating a Return to Work Action Plan

    -Click here for additional COVID-19 action plans for your business

Benefits Carrier Updates 

Carriers Providing Premium Relief for Insureds

Employer’s Guide to COVID-19

Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (CARES Act)

Employee Compensation and Benefits During Closures

Families First Coronavirus Response Act

Understanding the $2 Trillion Stimulus Package

Johns Hopkins Interactive Coronavirus Map

Kaiser Family - Potential costs of coronavirus treatment

COVID Act Now: Interactive Map for State-by-State Response (U.S.)

U.S. Department of Labor FAQs – FFCRA

Webinars and Videos

COVID-19 resource center

Webinar recording: Answers for Employers on COVID-19

Webinar recording: Important Updates on Coronavirus and the Workplace